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If you want something done, do-it-yourself: A Godwin Source Book, Part I Fabrics

January 18, 2011

There is, as far as I can see, no online directory or compilation of Godwin’s many different works.  Images and information are scattered across many sites, in various museum collections, private ownership and antiques galleries.  Following the principle of “if you want something done, do it yourself”, the PRSC  will be making its own source book, putting up the best of Godwin’s design, architecture and drawings, and starting with his textile work.

In the mid 1870s Godwin was busy designing a range of high-end textiles, mainly for covering furnishings.  He worked, for the most part, with a weaving company in the East End of London , Warner and Ramm, and made considerable use of his study of Japanese design in producing them.

Daliah


This fashionable and very expensive woven silk features a design taken directly from Japanese crests published at the time.

 

 

 


Syringa


The pattern on this silk is reminiscent of both medieval decoration and Japanese designs.

 

 

 

Butterfly Brocade


This woven silk textile was intended for use as curtaining or furniture upholstery. According to the records of Warners, this silk was made for the London decorating firm of Collinson & Lock. The main circular design of magnolia blossom comes directly from a Japanese crest. According to the V&A, “The name of the pattern, which was probably invented by Warners for identification purposes, is misleading. The silk is not a brocade but has a strong technical similarity to a brocatelle, which is a sumptuous, rigid, ribbed fabric suitable for battening to walls. It is possible that the name derived from a misreading of the abbreviation ‘Butterfly Broc’ by which it was listed in the firm’s weaving records.”

Bird


This was made from jacquard woven silk  and the  pattern was exhibited at the Philadelphia Exhibition of 1876

Furnishing Fabric


This furnishing fabric was made from woven silk and wool around 1874

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One Comment leave one →
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